Arts Thread

ARTSTHREAD

In advance of the deadline for Global Design Graduate Show 2021 in collaboration with Gucci, we interview Amy Cooper, a 2021 graduating student from The University of West England, Fashion Textiles. Our Global Design Graduate Show 2021 in collaboration with Gucci is open internationally to all art and design undergraduate or postgraduate students graduating in the Academic Year 2020-21 and the deadline to apply is August 31 2021.

See Amy’s ARTSTHREAD Portfolio



ARTSTHREAD:Where are you currently based? Describe your workspace at home?

Amy Cooper: I'm currently based in Bristol. My workspace is a desk with my laptop, PC and monitor - in the spare room at home during lockdown then when I moved back to my nan’s house when uni opened again I worked downstairs next to the living room.

Amy Cooper Amy used digital interfaces to design her collection.



ARTSTHREAD: What is the name, theme, concept and final outcome of your graduate project?

Amy Cooper: Welcome to Santa Carla My work is based around creating a virtual world to inhabit as an avatar. My inspiration was very personal for me - my ideas came from my fav film, places and my style icons. My final outcome is a collection of three digital garments that were made in Marvelous Designer.

ARTSTHREAD: Can you describe your concept and creative process?

Amy Cooper: I wanted to utilise a new platform for my virtual clothing - gaming. I chose to use The Sims 4 as a potential stage for my collection. It's a customisable world a player can inhabit using their avatar and I want those avatars to be wearing my clothing.

For my final year at University I wanted to indulge myself and start a project that was based around things I love. Firstly, I have always been fascinated with the 1987 film The Lost Boys. The themes of eternal youth, finding identity, post-human beings, queerness and fear of the other inspired my initial research. I translated the immortality, invulnerability and inhumanity of vampires into digital avatars that are not burdened with bodily needs or mortality.

To find the aesthetics and colour palette for my collection I turned to the idyllic, dated and over-saturated boardwalks and amusements of seaside towns. I have always loved visiting them, the atmosphere is so unique with its mix of natural landscapes and man-made tourist attractions. I was also inspired by naughties and noughties fashion as it influences my own style choices. My designs reflect the playful, youthful fashion of that time and it also draws on my personal nostalgia.

My design process was mostly digital with some physical sketching. I did a lot of experimenting, designing and making on Marvelous Designer.

ARTSTHREAD: Can you explain the thinking behind the key concepts and outcomes of your project?

Amy Cooper: Digital fashion is a sustainable alternative to the current fashion process. It produces a very small amount of waste compared to traditional garment making and uses a fraction of the energy. It is also easy to keep up with trends without last season's clothing ending up in landfills.

Because my collection is intended for the consumer's digital self, their avatars, I was free to design outside of the constrictions of menswear or womenswear. Digital beings are not biological or mortal entities, they exist purely on a virtual level so they have no need for a recognisable gender or even traditional skin tones, body sizes, attributes or features.

Amy's collection is intended to be worn by digital avatars seen here in the Sims 4, which allowed her to design outside of the traditional binary of mens and women's clothing.



ARTSTHREAD: How have you adapted your work to online tutorials and showcases?

Amy Cooper:Rather than producing sketchbooks this year, all my work has been digital. I used Adobe InDesign and Illustrator to show my research and development. Additionally, my portfolio has been completely digital. Although this fits my work more because I have been looking at virtual fashion and technology.

ARTSTHREAD: How has online learning changed your outcomes?

Amy Cooper:I always wanted to create a digital fashion collection, but originally I wanted to have it as a complimentary collection that worked alongside a physical one. But, with everything being online I wasn’t sure how much access I would have to the studios and technical rooms so I decided to work purely digitally.

ARTSTHREAD: Have you had to innovate when working by yourself at home?

Amy Cooper: It wasn’t a massive difficulty for me because I didn’t need loads of resources and equipment but I had to borrow a PC that would run the programs I needed. Other than that, staying motivated when I was by myself was difficult.

ARTSTHREAD: What's one thing that has helped you get through the past few months?

Amy Cooper:The Sims 4 - I use this game as an escape from reality; it is a world I can control completely.

ARTSTHREAD:What are the most positive learning outcomes from this process?

Amy Cooper: Learning how to use an industry level program like Marvelous Designer and finding a whole new pathway that I hadn’t considered before. Discovering digital fashion really rekindled my love for fashion and made me want to work in the fashion industry again.

ARTSTHREAD: How do you think design can help improve the world?

Amy Cooper:I see digital fashion as a sustainable future of the fashion industry. There is so much more to explore and find out what is possible to make virtually and how to utilise it.

ARTSTHREAD: What are your hopes for the future?

Amy Cooper: I would love to work for The Fabricant because they are one of the leading companies in digital fashion.

ARTSTHREAD: Thank you - Amy we wish you all the very best

See Amy’s ARTSTHREAD Portfolio

Images in slider: Amy Cooper and her work

Our Global Design Graduate Show 2021 in collaboration with Gucci is open internationally to all art and design undergraduate or postgraduate students graduating in the Academic Year 2020-21 and the deadline to apply is August 31 2021.

ARTS THREAD Newsletter

Of
Interest

ARTSTHREAD

In advance of the deadline for Global Design Graduate Show 2021 in collaboration with Gucci, we interview Amy Cooper, a 2021 graduating student from The University of West England, Fashion Textiles. Our Global Design Graduate Show 2021 in collaboration with Gucci is open internationally to all art and design undergraduate or postgraduate students graduating in the Academic Year 2020-21 and the deadline to apply is August 31 2021.

See Amy’s ARTSTHREAD Portfolio



ARTSTHREAD:Where are you currently based? Describe your workspace at home?

Amy Cooper: I'm currently based in Bristol. My workspace is a desk with my laptop, PC and monitor - in the spare room at home during lockdown then when I moved back to my nan’s house when uni opened again I worked downstairs next to the living room.

Amy Cooper Amy used digital interfaces to design her collection.



ARTSTHREAD: What is the name, theme, concept and final outcome of your graduate project?

Amy Cooper: Welcome to Santa Carla My work is based around creating a virtual world to inhabit as an avatar. My inspiration was very personal for me - my ideas came from my fav film, places and my style icons. My final outcome is a collection of three digital garments that were made in Marvelous Designer.

ARTSTHREAD: Can you describe your concept and creative process?

Amy Cooper: I wanted to utilise a new platform for my virtual clothing - gaming. I chose to use The Sims 4 as a potential stage for my collection. It's a customisable world a player can inhabit using their avatar and I want those avatars to be wearing my clothing.

For my final year at University I wanted to indulge myself and start a project that was based around things I love. Firstly, I have always been fascinated with the 1987 film The Lost Boys. The themes of eternal youth, finding identity, post-human beings, queerness and fear of the other inspired my initial research. I translated the immortality, invulnerability and inhumanity of vampires into digital avatars that are not burdened with bodily needs or mortality.

To find the aesthetics and colour palette for my collection I turned to the idyllic, dated and over-saturated boardwalks and amusements of seaside towns. I have always loved visiting them, the atmosphere is so unique with its mix of natural landscapes and man-made tourist attractions. I was also inspired by naughties and noughties fashion as it influences my own style choices. My designs reflect the playful, youthful fashion of that time and it also draws on my personal nostalgia.

My design process was mostly digital with some physical sketching. I did a lot of experimenting, designing and making on Marvelous Designer.

ARTSTHREAD: Can you explain the thinking behind the key concepts and outcomes of your project?

Amy Cooper: Digital fashion is a sustainable alternative to the current fashion process. It produces a very small amount of waste compared to traditional garment making and uses a fraction of the energy. It is also easy to keep up with trends without last season's clothing ending up in landfills.

Because my collection is intended for the consumer's digital self, their avatars, I was free to design outside of the constrictions of menswear or womenswear. Digital beings are not biological or mortal entities, they exist purely on a virtual level so they have no need for a recognisable gender or even traditional skin tones, body sizes, attributes or features.

Amy's collection is intended to be worn by digital avatars seen here in the Sims 4, which allowed her to design outside of the traditional binary of mens and women's clothing.



ARTSTHREAD: How have you adapted your work to online tutorials and showcases?

Amy Cooper:Rather than producing sketchbooks this year, all my work has been digital. I used Adobe InDesign and Illustrator to show my research and development. Additionally, my portfolio has been completely digital. Although this fits my work more because I have been looking at virtual fashion and technology.

ARTSTHREAD: How has online learning changed your outcomes?

Amy Cooper:I always wanted to create a digital fashion collection, but originally I wanted to have it as a complimentary collection that worked alongside a physical one. But, with everything being online I wasn’t sure how much access I would have to the studios and technical rooms so I decided to work purely digitally.

ARTSTHREAD: Have you had to innovate when working by yourself at home?

Amy Cooper: It wasn’t a massive difficulty for me because I didn’t need loads of resources and equipment but I had to borrow a PC that would run the programs I needed. Other than that, staying motivated when I was by myself was difficult.

ARTSTHREAD: What's one thing that has helped you get through the past few months?

Amy Cooper:The Sims 4 - I use this game as an escape from reality; it is a world I can control completely.

ARTSTHREAD:What are the most positive learning outcomes from this process?

Amy Cooper: Learning how to use an industry level program like Marvelous Designer and finding a whole new pathway that I hadn’t considered before. Discovering digital fashion really rekindled my love for fashion and made me want to work in the fashion industry again.

ARTSTHREAD: How do you think design can help improve the world?

Amy Cooper:I see digital fashion as a sustainable future of the fashion industry. There is so much more to explore and find out what is possible to make virtually and how to utilise it.

ARTSTHREAD: What are your hopes for the future?

Amy Cooper: I would love to work for The Fabricant because they are one of the leading companies in digital fashion.

ARTSTHREAD: Thank you - Amy we wish you all the very best

See Amy’s ARTSTHREAD Portfolio

Images in slider: Amy Cooper and her work

Our Global Design Graduate Show 2021 in collaboration with Gucci is open internationally to all art and design undergraduate or postgraduate students graduating in the Academic Year 2020-21 and the deadline to apply is August 31 2021.

ARTS THREAD Newsletter

Of
Interest