Arts Thread

Above: Jibbe van Schie / Camille Champion / Juliette Corrieu / Alma Lomholt Breun / Bruno Szenk / Eleni Ioannidou / Anna Mareschal de Charentenay / Hugo Peels / Lewis Duckworth

ARTS THREAD takes in highlights in material exploration from the Design Academy Eindhoven graduates at the recent Dutch Design Week 2022.

Endless Etching is a contemporary homage to the age-old craft of intaglio printmaking. Jibbe van Schie built his own automated etching machine that uses the traditional drypoint technique. He trained a self-learning algorithm with thousands of etches from digital archives, enabling it to create autonomous works of art. From the input of both historic and contemporary prints, the machine developed its own artistic signature. Instead of engraving a flat copper plate and filling the grooves with ink to make a print, this smart apparatus adds yet another dimension to the craft. It scratches its endless output onto a rotating acrylic tube and the ink is replaced by light.

Also by Jibbe van Schie is the project Woven Translation. Fascinated by how looms and knitting machines render digital pixels into textile patterns, Jibbe manipulated the input and workings of a self-made 3D printer. His aim was to create an output that resembles a multi-coloured knit or weave – in a ceramic version. Weaving viscose strands of clay, layer by layer, stitch by stitch, Jibbe allowed his fascination to take on a solid form.


During her stay in South Korea, Camille Champion mastered the age-old technique of Jiseung. This weaving craft dating from the Joseon Dynasty uses old books and paper to create basketry. Camille introduced it into a modern Western context: her own primary school in France. She created a small weaving guide for the children, who learned to make their own paper threads from old newspapers, weave them on a loom and build a tent-like structure for their classroom. Twist and Roll showcases how the educational system can benefit from crafts.

Juliette Corrieu took found materials (branches, weeds, leather, bricks) and turned them into tools (letters, stamp, map, mattress) that allow for imprecision, depending on who uses them and how they do it. In contrast to the fast and automated world of printing, her process is slow and meditative. The project In-print allows for surprise, for the unplanned, for unexpected discoveries – exactly the qualities that our over-regulated world seeks to eliminate.


Sheep are kept in the Netherlands for meat, milk or grazing. The massive amount of wool they produce annually however is in large part not used. Historically low wool prices turned it into a burden rather than a resource for Dutch farmers. Wool therefore often ends up in landfills or in an incinerator. In Comfort in the herd, Alma Lomholt Breun collected and analysed wool from the Drentse Heideschaap, Nederlandse Bonte Schaap and Texelaar, and an item was developed for each breed following their specific qualities.

In I=Fe, Bruno Szenk extracts and transforms rust into pigment using tools fashioned from simple everyday items (personal belongings, found objects, hardware, urban detritus). This method facilitates reflection, production, and documentation, enabling research insights to materialise through the pigment.

Most cut flowers on sale at florists or in grocery stores have an average life-span of just ten days. Meanwhile, the chemicals they’re grown with cause serious health issues to the industry workers and the environment. Paying tribute to the Osmia Avosetta bee species that builds underground nests out of flowers, the discarded petals are combined with beeswax and pressed into moulds to be turned into vases in the project Osmia Avosetta Vases by Eleni Ioannidou .


Inspired by the similarities between a clay slab and a piece of fabric, Anna Mareschal de Charentenay decided to challenge conventions and exchange material-specific techniques in her project Tailored Ceramics . Anna borrowed the art of textile pattern making and assembly to introduce a new vocabulary into ceramics. In the realm of fabric, the seams hold the pieces together and create shape and volume. The malleability of clay, however, allows for ‘seamless’ connections, with the material being smoothened out.

Hugo Peels creates a sustainable building material from the large hills of natural stone dust in the Netherlands now considered useless. He showcases in T he Lost Mountains of Holland the value of combining this dust with rammed earth techniques. Crushed stone is used in various industries such as construction. This process produces a fine powder that currently is downcycled as landfill matter, buried beneath dykes and roads. Where the crushing mimics erosion, rammed earth techniques mimic sedimentation. Layer upon layer, earth is rammed and compacted to a solid, metamorphosing into a new material. 

In London alone, 6,000 trees are cut down prematurely each year. If a tree falls… by Lewis Duckworth aims to create community-driven processing systems together with local experts such as tree harvesters and craftsmen that utilize every part of the tree. Branches can become spoons and bark can be turned into natural textile dye. Meanwhile, on-site workshops and demonstrations inform the public about urban nature and its value. In this way, the trees can live on and play a role in a community’s collective experience and memory.

Find out more and see more projects from the Design Academy Eindhoven website.


Slider Image credits: Jibbe van Schie, Juliette Corrieu, Anna Mareschal de Charentenay - photos Nicole Marnati / Camille Champion, Alma Lomholt Breun, Eleni Ioannidou - photos Femke Reijerman / Bruno Szenk - photo Ronald Smits / Hugo Peels, Lewis Duckworth - photo Iris Rijskamp

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Above: Jibbe van Schie / Camille Champion / Juliette Corrieu / Alma Lomholt Breun / Bruno Szenk / Eleni Ioannidou / Anna Mareschal de Charentenay / Hugo Peels / Lewis Duckworth

ARTS THREAD takes in highlights in material exploration from the Design Academy Eindhoven graduates at the recent Dutch Design Week 2022.

Endless Etching is a contemporary homage to the age-old craft of intaglio printmaking. Jibbe van Schie built his own automated etching machine that uses the traditional drypoint technique. He trained a self-learning algorithm with thousands of etches from digital archives, enabling it to create autonomous works of art. From the input of both historic and contemporary prints, the machine developed its own artistic signature. Instead of engraving a flat copper plate and filling the grooves with ink to make a print, this smart apparatus adds yet another dimension to the craft. It scratches its endless output onto a rotating acrylic tube and the ink is replaced by light.

Also by Jibbe van Schie is the project Woven Translation. Fascinated by how looms and knitting machines render digital pixels into textile patterns, Jibbe manipulated the input and workings of a self-made 3D printer. His aim was to create an output that resembles a multi-coloured knit or weave – in a ceramic version. Weaving viscose strands of clay, layer by layer, stitch by stitch, Jibbe allowed his fascination to take on a solid form.


During her stay in South Korea, Camille Champion mastered the age-old technique of Jiseung. This weaving craft dating from the Joseon Dynasty uses old books and paper to create basketry. Camille introduced it into a modern Western context: her own primary school in France. She created a small weaving guide for the children, who learned to make their own paper threads from old newspapers, weave them on a loom and build a tent-like structure for their classroom. Twist and Roll showcases how the educational system can benefit from crafts.

Juliette Corrieu took found materials (branches, weeds, leather, bricks) and turned them into tools (letters, stamp, map, mattress) that allow for imprecision, depending on who uses them and how they do it. In contrast to the fast and automated world of printing, her process is slow and meditative. The project In-print allows for surprise, for the unplanned, for unexpected discoveries – exactly the qualities that our over-regulated world seeks to eliminate.


Sheep are kept in the Netherlands for meat, milk or grazing. The massive amount of wool they produce annually however is in large part not used. Historically low wool prices turned it into a burden rather than a resource for Dutch farmers. Wool therefore often ends up in landfills or in an incinerator. In Comfort in the herd, Alma Lomholt Breun collected and analysed wool from the Drentse Heideschaap, Nederlandse Bonte Schaap and Texelaar, and an item was developed for each breed following their specific qualities.

In I=Fe, Bruno Szenk extracts and transforms rust into pigment using tools fashioned from simple everyday items (personal belongings, found objects, hardware, urban detritus). This method facilitates reflection, production, and documentation, enabling research insights to materialise through the pigment.

Most cut flowers on sale at florists or in grocery stores have an average life-span of just ten days. Meanwhile, the chemicals they’re grown with cause serious health issues to the industry workers and the environment. Paying tribute to the Osmia Avosetta bee species that builds underground nests out of flowers, the discarded petals are combined with beeswax and pressed into moulds to be turned into vases in the project Osmia Avosetta Vases by Eleni Ioannidou .


Inspired by the similarities between a clay slab and a piece of fabric, Anna Mareschal de Charentenay decided to challenge conventions and exchange material-specific techniques in her project Tailored Ceramics . Anna borrowed the art of textile pattern making and assembly to introduce a new vocabulary into ceramics. In the realm of fabric, the seams hold the pieces together and create shape and volume. The malleability of clay, however, allows for ‘seamless’ connections, with the material being smoothened out.

Hugo Peels creates a sustainable building material from the large hills of natural stone dust in the Netherlands now considered useless. He showcases in T he Lost Mountains of Holland the value of combining this dust with rammed earth techniques. Crushed stone is used in various industries such as construction. This process produces a fine powder that currently is downcycled as landfill matter, buried beneath dykes and roads. Where the crushing mimics erosion, rammed earth techniques mimic sedimentation. Layer upon layer, earth is rammed and compacted to a solid, metamorphosing into a new material. 

In London alone, 6,000 trees are cut down prematurely each year. If a tree falls… by Lewis Duckworth aims to create community-driven processing systems together with local experts such as tree harvesters and craftsmen that utilize every part of the tree. Branches can become spoons and bark can be turned into natural textile dye. Meanwhile, on-site workshops and demonstrations inform the public about urban nature and its value. In this way, the trees can live on and play a role in a community’s collective experience and memory.

Find out more and see more projects from the Design Academy Eindhoven website.


Slider Image credits: Jibbe van Schie, Juliette Corrieu, Anna Mareschal de Charentenay - photos Nicole Marnati / Camille Champion, Alma Lomholt Breun, Eleni Ioannidou - photos Femke Reijerman / Bruno Szenk - photo Ronald Smits / Hugo Peels, Lewis Duckworth - photo Iris Rijskamp

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Sara Sozzani Maino's favourites from Global Design Graduate Show 2022 in collaboration with Gucci

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January 17th, 2023
Written by Honor Rose Cooper Hedges
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ArtEZ Fashion Design Collectie Arnhem 2023

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