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Emily Holland
March Architecture - Applied Design In Architecture

Oxford Brookes University

Graduates: 2022

Specialisms: Architecture

My location: Oxford, United Kingdom

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Oxford Brookes University

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Emily Holland

emily-holland ArtsThread Profile

First Name: Emily

Last Name: Holland

University / College: Oxford Brookes University

Course / Program: March Architecture - Applied Design In Architecture

Graduates: 2022

Specialisms: Architecture

My Location: Oxford, United Kingdom

Website: Click To See Website

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Pioneering the Symbiotic Shift - The Regeneration of Nature in Kingston Upon Hull

Views  288

Appreciations  5

Comments  0

Specialisms:

Architecture

A paradigm shift in architectural design is required to address the impacts of climate change related disasters if we are to secure a resilient future. Projected sea level rise threatens the UK estuarine city of Kingston Upon Hull which is forecast to be submerged by 2050. This project is set in a 2032 future scenario where the city is transitioning from conflicting with nature to approaching a future symbiosis where nature in urban settings can flourish. As a means of inviting nature back into land dominated by industry, disused areas of hardscaping and flat car parks along the River Hull are being removed to make way for water - promoting the establishment of saltmarshes that line the vulnerable city with a natural flood defence. The building proposal is a Saltmarsh Institute dedicated to the growth and development of Saltmarshes throughout the city. The design is formed by an interconnected web of ‘living system structures’ that promote saltmarsh growth and biodiversity regeneration. They mimic nature's function by running on sunlight, recycling waste, storing water all whilst being constructed of natural materials to create a positive impact on the existing ecosystem. The wide footings of the structures increase saltmarsh sedimentation and act as a habitat for Hull's declining maritime species, whilst being future flood resilient.